Researching Usability

Posts Tagged ‘Libri

Heuristic report

This week the heuristic inspection report has been published and is available to read. If you would like to read it feedback is very welcome. The document is available in Word or as a PDF from the NeSC digital library: http://bit.ly/ux2inspectionreport. It is a sizeable document so thanks in advance for taking the time to read it! 🙂

Not what you know, nor who you know, but who you know already

This is a research paper which was a collaboration between myself, Hazel Hall and Gunilla Widén-Wulff. The research was undertaken when I first graduated from my Masters in 2007 and this week I received the good news that it will be published  in Libri: International Journal of Libraries and Information Services at some point this year. The paper examines online information sharing behaviours through the lens of social exchange theory. My contribution was the investigation into the commenting behaviour of undergraduate students at Edinburgh’s Napier University as part of their coursework. I’m very excited by this news as it is only my second publication. I look forward to seeing it in print and will provide details here if it becomes available online.

TAM part 2: revised acceptance model by Bernadette Szajna

Another paper which I read this week was ‘Epirical Evaluation of the Revised Technology Acceptance Model’ by Bernadette Szajna (1996). In this paper Szajna uses the revised Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) from Davis et al. (1989) to measure user acceptance of an electronic mail system over a 15 week period in a longitudinal study. By collecting data from participants at different points in the study she was able to reveal that self-reported usage differed from actual usage and that as a consequence it may not be appropriate as a surrogate measure. This supports what those who’ve been running usability tests have been saying for a while: what users say and what they do are seldom the same. In user research terms this means that observing what users do during their interaction with a system is as important as what they say about their experience.

In addition the paper revealed that “unless users perceive an IS as being useful at first, its ease of use has no effect on the formation of intention”. This struck a chord with me because as a usability professional I often assume that ease of use is a barrier to the usefulness of a system; if a user does not know how to manipulate the interface they are unable to discover the (possibly useful) information below the surface. Then when I was considering the usefulness of Twitter groups I realised that it began to follow the same pattern.  Twitter groups is a recent addition to Twitter and available to users. It allows those you are following to be categorised into self-named groups. For example, it’s best application is a means for users to differentiate their professional connections from personal ones. In theory it is a good idea and one which I thought I might use as a way of separating out different networks would certainly make them easier to monitor. I can’t imagine it being too difficult to set up a group if I so wished but the problem is that I never considered it useful for me to do so and consequently I  never did (note: I created a private group today to test my theory). The reason in this case is that I rarely use Twitter’s website to monitor or communicate with those I’m following. There are many different client managers such as TweetDeck who can do this for me. I’m sure there are a few people out there who have created groups and view them regularly but could these people be in the minority? I’d be interested to test my theory so any comments on your own Twitter group behaviour is welcome.

My conclusion is that (for me) the usefulness of the groups tool was a greater barrier to use than the ease of creating a group, verifying Szajna’s findings. This illustrates how important usefulness is to the user acceptance of technology and is therefore something that should be evaluated in every system to ensure success.

Mendeley Webinars

Lastly Mendeley directors are hosting webinars which will provide an introduction to its features including inserting citations and using the collaborative tools. The webinars will be held on Tuesday, February 23, 2010 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM GMT and Wednesday, February 24, 2010 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM GMT respectively. I have signed up for the webinar on Wednesday and look forward to learning more. So far I’ve managed to add items to my library and connect with others online but don’t feel I have exploited its features fully and am having difficulties amending my bibliography in Word. Hopefully this webinar will provide help and advice.

Advertisements

del.icio.us bookmarks

Twitter feed

Archive